Publications

2018
Amarasekera HS. Upgrading wood based industries in Sri Lanka with special reference to Moratuwa furniture cluster, in South Asia Conference on Multidisciplinary Research SMAR 2018. Colombo, Sri Lanka : International Research and Development Institution TIRDI; 2018:2. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Upgrading Wood Based Industries in Sri Lanka with special reference to Moratuwa Furniture Cluster   H S Amarasekera Department of Forestry and Environmental Science, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka   The wood-based industry is one of the oldest industries in the country that provides livelihood to many people in both rural and urban areas. However, the industry has been in a state of deterioration in terms of quality and competitiveness due to inadequate wood supply in term of quality and quantity, unfavorable business climate, scarcity of trained manpower, lack of market opportunities, research support and finances for investments to improve the industry. There are around 1700 industries in Moratuwa wood based furniture cluster and it has been in existence for many decades. This industry has deteriorated over the years and is currently incapable of producing furniture of high quality for the export market.  However large firms in the cluster use advanced technology and have a totally integrated production process with saw mills, timber seasoning and treatment facilities indicating that it is an organized cluster that can be upgraded to an innovative cluster by implementing a comprehensive development program. There have been several initiatives on development of wood working industry and timber utilization research on timber processing have yielded data towards upscaling and redefining the small timber manufactures in Sri Lanka.  The key options that can be adopted to improve the industry are to improve utilization of available sustainable timber resources to increase the supply of raw materials to the Moratuwa cluster, improve product quality, increase marketability of products and minimize environmental pollution. Selected industries in this cluster can be upgraded into international standards by introduction of new technology and transfer of knowledge, providing systematic training in improving furniture designing, timber preservation, seasoning and machine maintaining capabilities.   Achievement of productive wood products industry will make a significant contribution towards employment generation and increasing the percentage of contribution to GDP by Timber based products. Keywords – wood industry, furniture, forestry, timber, development plan https://www.dropbox.com/s/kysnyqk8vbr4q7t/Amarasekera%20Moratuwa%20wood%20working%20industry%20SMAR%20conference%20abstract.pdf?dl=0  https://www.slideshare.net/studentlanka/upgrading-wood-based-industries-in-sri-lanka-with-special-reference-to-moratuwa-furniture-cluster
2017
H.S. A, C.M.E. A. Comparison of Seasoning Defects due to Different Kilns and Kiln Schedules for Teak. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium [Internet]. 2017;2017(22). Publisher's VersionAbstract
Timber is one of the major construction material in Sri Lanka and timber seasoning is a common practice for achieving dimensional stability. The industry uses timber for interior and exterior joinery work such as doors, windows, door and window frames and panelling. However, forming seasoning defects is a common issue which prevalent in this industry. Therefore this study is conducted to identify defects caused by seasoning for teak timber and to find out solutions. For this reason, there different kilns located in Biyagama, Horana and Kottawa, operated under different schedules were selected. The impacts of three schedules were tested using teak planks. Kiln temperature and moisture content were measured for the entire seasoning period. Cupping, twisting and end cracking were measured as defects. Moreover, prong test was also conducted to determine the stress condition of the dried wood samples. Among the selected kilns, only one was maintained under the operating parameters recommended by the kiln manufacturer. The results revealed that the kiln which was programmed to regulate temperature produced the least amount of defects. However, moisture content was not programed for any of the kilns. Therefore it can be concluded that temperature has more impacted on causing defects on timber drying in the seasoning period. Therefore it is essential to regulate the temperature as per with kiln schedule. Keywords: Construction industry, Timber identification, Seasoning issues, Kiln drying
H.S. A, A.M.C A. Evaluation of Cutting Time and Waste Generation in Different Band Sawmills in Sri Lanka with Special Reference to Teak Timber. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium [Internet]. 2017;2017(22):238. Publisher's VersionAbstract
In recent years, due to rising raw material and labor costs, increasing attention is being devoted to improve wood sawing practices. While a high cutting rate is still among the most desired characteristics, other factors such as improved cutting accuracy and surface quality, reduced kerf losses, noise, downtime, and maintenance of the machine are becoming increasingly important. However, band sawmilling have advantages over circular saws which include higher cutting speeds lower kerf waste, and typically lower noise levels. Considering above advantages several Sri Lankan companies have now established band saw milling factories. Thus the key objectives of this study were to evaluate cutting time of band sawmills and to investigate waste generation. Three different band saws (TRAK-MET TTP 600 premium; TM, Wood-Mizer LT20; WM, and Veheran; V) which are commonly used in Sri Lanka were used to this study. Evaluation of cutting time and waste generation in different band sawmills were done with special reference to Teak timber. Results show that the fastest cutting time in WM (mean cutting time of 27s), medium cutting time in TM (mean cutting time of 60s) and the slowest cutting time in Veheran (mean cutting time of 180s). The factors such as tooth profile, setting value, sharpening frequency, status of lubrication, tensioning pressure of the blade and capacity and the condition of the machine may have affected to the fastest cutting time. According to the results of evaluation of saw dust Veheran showed the highest wastage owing to high kerf and factors such as poor lubrication, lower tensioning pressure. Moreover, cutting time negatively correlated with the lubrication and saw tension in band sawmills. Therefore, it can be concluded that proper saw mill management is necessary for reduction of timber wastage and increase the efficiency of the industry.
2016
Amarasekera HS, Venukasan T. Investigation of Properties of Rubber Wood Related to Solid Wood Flooring. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium [Internet]. 2016;21. Publisher's VersionAbstract
A large scale solid wood flooring factory is to be established in Sri Lanka. On the planning stage of this industry it was found that information on wood properties of local timbers such as Hevea brasiliensis for wood flooring are not available. Hence, the present study has been conducted to gather data on selected wood properties of Rubber wood and how the wood quality changes with growth rate of trees.Hevea brasiliensis 35 year old trees were selected from three size classes: suppressed, co-dominant and dominant. Sample disks were removed at top (80%), middle (50%) and breast height of the log length. Radial variations were also studied at percentage distances from pith to bark.Wood quality was assessed by ring specific gravity. Ring width remained more or less constant from pith towards bark with slight decrease towards the bark indicating the uniform growth rate. However no specific variation was observed in ring specific gravity. This radial variation of growth rate and specific gravity was similar in all three size classes. Application of Rubber wood as solid wood elements for flooring was experimentally assessed by hardness to loads applied to the wood and specific gravity. The mean specific gravity of suppressed, co-dominant and dominant trees were 0.564, 0.629 and 0.631 respectively indicating that the specific gravity of Rubber wood lies within the required standard for flooring which is 0.5-0.75. In the hardness test, it was observed that all three size classes generally show a gradual increase in hardness from pith towards bark. The values of average hardness of suppressed, co dominant and dominant trees were 341 kgf, 405 kgf and 433 kgf, hence co dominant and dominant trees have hardness values above 400 kgf, the standard value for wood flooring. These results indicate that Hevea brasiliensis has wood properties which are within European standard and Indian standard for manufacture of wooden flooring.
2015
JKPC Jayawardhane, P. K. P. Perera LARRSHS. The effect of quality attributes in determination of price for plantation-grown Teak (Tectona grandis) logs in Sri Lanka. Annals of Forest Research. 2015:1–12.
Senadheera DKL, Ranasinghe DMHSK, Wahala WASB, Amarasekera HS. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plantation to the Proceeded Wood Products via State Timber Corporation Depots for Selected Tree Species using Life Cycle Assessment. Journal of Tropical Forestry and Environment. 2015;5.
Caldera HTS, Amarasekera HS. Investigation of Sawmill Management and Technology on Waste Reduction at Selected Sawmills in Moratuwa, Sri Lanka. Journal of Tropical Forestry and Environment. 2015;5.
Senadheera L, Ranasinghe H, Amarasekera H, Wahala S. Product Carbon Footprint of Wooden Products in Sri Lanka Special Reference to a Life Cycle of an Arm Chair. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2015;20.
Fernando TD, Amarasekera H. Study on the Determination of Sri Lankan Timber with Least Shrinkage Movement for Furniture and Joinery Work. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2015;20.
Karunathilake EMBM, Amarasekera HS, Dewendra MC. Treatability Performance of Kempas, Eucalyptus and Pine Sleepers with Coal-Tar Creosote. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2015;20.
2014
Muthumala CK, Amarasekara HS. Investigation the Authenticity of Local and Imported Timber Species in Sri Lanka. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2014;18.
Muthumala CK, Amarasekara HS. Construction of a Dicotomous Key for Common Local and Imported Timber Species in Sri Lanka. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2014;18.
Caldera HTS, Amarasekera HS. Investigation of Sawmill Management and Technology on Waste Reduction at Selected Sawmills in Moratuwa. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2014;18.
Caldera HTS, Amarasekera HS, Rajapaksha TR, Daundasekera WB. Investigation of Sawmill Management and Technology on Yield Optimisation at Selected Sawmills in Moratuwa. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2014;18.
Bandara RMNS, Amarasekera HS. Webometric Analysis of Institutions Involve in Environmental Science Related Research Publications in Sri Lanka (2003-2013). Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2014;18.
2013
Jayasekara TK, Fernando KMEP, Amarasekara HS. WOOD DECAYING AGARIC FUNGI AND THEIR PREFERENCE TO SOME SRI LANKAN TIMBER SPECIES. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2013.
De Silva SN, Amarasekara HS. ATTACK BY WOOD-DESTROYING INSECTS ON EIGHT COMMERCIAL TIMBER SPECIES. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2013.
Perera PKP, Amarasekara HS. COMPARISON OF THE SPECIFIC GRAVITY VARIATION OF Swietenia macrophylla, Khaya senega/ens; s AND Pau/ownia fortunei. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2013.
Ruwanpathirana ND, Amarasekara HS, De Silva MP. VARIATION OF SPECIFIC GRAVITY WITHIN Eucalyptus grandis TREES GROWING IN DIFFERENT SITE CLASSES. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2013.
Rathnayake RSS, Amarasekera HS. DEVELOPMENT OF DRYING SCHEDULES FOR RUBBER AND PINE TIMBER FOR THE DEHUMIDIFICATION KILN DRYING. Proceedings of International Forestry and Environment Symposium. 2013.

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